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01-Sep-2017 18:41

For the unitary authority which encompasses Brighton, see Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods.

The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086).

By 1708 other parishes in Sussex were charged rates to alleviate poverty in Brighton, and Daniel Defoe wrote that the expected £8,000 cost of providing sea defences was "more than the whole town was worth".

The population declined to 2,000 in the early 18th century.

and an important Brythonic settlement existed at Hollingbury Camp on Hollingbury Hill.

This Celtic Iron Age encampment dates from the 3rd or 2nd century BC and is circumscribed by substantial earthwork outer walls with a diameter of After the Romans left in the early 4th century AD, the Brighton area returned to the control of the native Celts.

Growth of the town was further encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent (later King George IV) after his first visit in 1783.

Many of the major attractions were built during the Victorian era, such as the Grand Hotel (1864), the West Pier (1866), and the Palace Pier (1899).

Having lost the Battle of Worcester, King Charles II, after hiding for 42 days in various places, fled on the evening of 15 October 1651 in the "Surprise" from Brighthelmstone to his exile in Fécamp, France.

The university has three campuses: Streatham Campus and St Luke's Campus in Exeter; and the Penryn Campus near Falmouth, in Cornwall.